Talking at gigs

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13strongmonsters
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Talking at gigs

Post by 13strongmonsters » Thu Sep 11, 2008 15:07

How do you deal with it? Ignore, censure, or torture?

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by Mr Bear » Thu Sep 11, 2008 15:18

Most of the time I try to ignore it, while anger and resent build inside my gut. That said I did censure two people for talking at a Stereolab gig once, then quickly fled.

The worst thing I've witnessed was two people talking during a Spoon gig while BOTH filming it on their mobiles. I was incredulous.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by SophieC » Thu Sep 11, 2008 15:27

The only time i've said anything to a bunch o'chatters at a gig was during a darren hayman set at junktion 7 in nottingham. i'd been clenching my teeth and rolling my eyes and tutting at them for three entire songs as they chatted loudly about the state of their finances. one time i even clenched, tutted and rolled all at once but they probably thought i was just quite ill. so i turned round and told them to, "go and talk about their credit cards somewhere else" or something equally lame. one of them was quite shocked and spluttered, "i was only talking", to which, and i'm ashamed at the degree i sounded like nicky campbell on watchdog, i said, "i haven't paid £7 to hear you talk." ZING! then they left the venue huffing and puffing. WIN!

the worst i've ever heard chatting at a gig was during a casiotone for the painfully alone gig at the social. they used to let these braying hipster student look-at-my-jacket idiots into the end of gigs for free for the club night that started straight after. they outnumbered the crowd by about 4 to 1 and the chat level was so extreme i could actually barely hear the band. owen told them all to shut up form stage to zero effect. when he came off stage he was virtually in tears. that always used to happen at the social. probably still does, but even if i the smiths appeared their i think i'd find an excuse to give it a miss. the pains of being pure heart are playing there soon though. bah.
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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by Mr Bear » Thu Sep 11, 2008 15:33

JamieC wrote:i'd been clenching my teeth and rolling my eyes and tutting at them for three entire songs as they chatted loudly about the state of their finances. one time i even clenched, tutted and rolled all at once but they probably thought i was just quite ill.
I've been known to do that too. You'd think people would notice someone in clear discomfort infront of them really. "whoa, that guy's getting middle class on my arse".

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by boney » Thu Sep 11, 2008 15:46

Thing is, we all do this.

Some of the worst talking through bands I've ever seen was by a gaggle of you folks at the back of the Rescue Rooms when I was seeing Saint Joan for the first time. They're pretty quietish folk-noir type stuff, all I could hear was loud chattering near the back. I was getting grief off non-twee Nottinghammers who identified me with he guilty parties. That gig, The Chemistry Experiment were on second and I was being polite and trying to talk quietly back to whoever and I got outed as talking from the stage and got evil stares. Basically, we all act like pissed arseholes sometimes, dependent on how delighted we are to see our mates or how unbothered we are by who is on stage. I try personally to not talk if it will interfere with anyone elses enjoyment to any degree, but I too am frequently a pissed arsehole.

The worst I've encountered was the CFTPA Jamie mentioned above. I remember Owen exchanging hugs with the dismayed faithful at the end. Also pretty much anything on Stealth at a Saturday night - The Blow falling prey not only to blathering but to stage incursion by people not there for the gig.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by a layer of chips » Thu Sep 11, 2008 15:54

The only time I had a go at someone at The Social I got headbutted. By someone wearing pixie boots.

I don't usually mention that second bit.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by soft revolution » Thu Sep 11, 2008 16:10

The time I put MStU on was the worst I'd ever heard talking, and I felt really bad about it. We told some of the worst offenders to shut up because it was rediculous, but then that just put a really bad atmosphere on the rest of the night.

Weirdly, some of the worst talkers I know are musicians.
And by me, I mean, Flexo.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by Paquito » Thu Sep 11, 2008 16:21

Speaking of musicians...

I went to see a band called The Low Lows in Edinburgh a few months back and it was the wee shites in one of the support bands who nearly ruined it by talking over another one of the support bands (a band called Eagleowl, who are pretty quiet, quite Low-esque).

So, the soundman told them to shut the fuck up and promptly turned Eagleowl's sound up! He was a good sort. Which was lucky as I was very close to giving them a taste of my shoes.
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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by SophieC » Thu Sep 11, 2008 16:30

craigboney wrote:Thing is, we all do this.

Some of the worst talking through bands I've ever seen was by a gaggle of you folks at the back of the Rescue Rooms when I was seeing Saint Joan for the first time. They're pretty quietish folk-noir type stuff, all I could hear was loud chattering near the back. I was getting grief off non-twee Nottinghammers who identified me with he guilty parties. That gig, The Chemistry Experiment were on second and I was being polite and trying to talk quietly back to whoever and I got outed as talking from the stage and got evil stares. Basically, we all act like pissed arseholes sometimes, dependent on how delighted we are to see our mates or how unbothered we are by who is on stage. I try personally to not talk if it will interfere with anyone elses enjoyment to any degree, but I too am frequently a pissed arsehole.

The worst I've encountered was the CFTPA Jamie mentioned above. I remember Owen exchanging hugs with the dismayed faithful at the end. Also pretty much anything on Stealth at a Saturday night - The Blow falling prey not only to blathering but to stage incursion by people not there for the gig.
i agree. i think it's mainly craig who makes the noise at gigs. arf. as much as i hate to admit it i think you've probably got a point actually. a lot of us do it, probably without thinking about exactly how loud we're being. though nowadays i do try to just leave if i'm not enjoying a band and i'm sober enough to have a logical thought process. some people appear to do it constantly through every band on the bill though, which is utterly mental and infuriating. WHY ARE YOU HERE CHAT BOY?

god i remember that blow gig. she was having to push pissed gyrating lasses off the stage. i thought it was all going to get a bit nasty.
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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by Paquito » Thu Sep 11, 2008 16:33

I've calmed down markedly when watching a band I don't like. I've got quite good at the inward seethe.

This was due to being chastised for heckling a shit band while drunk a couple of years back.
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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by let it ride » Thu Sep 11, 2008 17:00

Yes, I agree that we all do it. But I think what separates nicer people from the less nice people in this matter is:

a) WHERE you choose to have your conversation. I hate people who stand at the front only to chat to each other the entire gig. It's tolerable if it is done quietly at the back. I try to do this if I really need to talk to someone, if I can't go outside to do it.
b) How you talk. Shouting and not even trying to hide the fact that you are not bothered about the band, or quietly and in a nice way.

I once got very, very close to a fist fight. This was with two massive guys in Stockholm. I was on my own, I was 17 and watching Wilco and having a great time. Then the two drunk massive guys push themselves forward in a real arsey way. I made sure they couldn't get past me and that is when they just chat lots with each other going. "WHOOOOAAAA THIS IS A COOL GIG YEAH WHOOOOOOOOOOA JEFF TWEEDY WOOOOOO!" and I attempted to tell them off in a vaguely polite/passive aggressive way, but they couldn't hear me. In the end (I can't believe I didn't get punched) I just flipped them off, like IN THEIR FACES.

Then they started pulling my ponytail going "HAHAH ANGRY GIRL!" and I kind of lost my faith in humanity.
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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by lynsosaurus » Thu Sep 11, 2008 18:11

i've definitely done some talking at gigs before, but i can't think of any time where i've been loud and obnoxious about it. the worst thing is when you're with someone you know and they're talking at you and you're trying to be polite to them and not tell them to shut up, but inwardly you're utterly mortified because everyone is glaring at you and you're not even doing anything.

when i saw the just joans play a few weeks back, the support band came off stage and stood RIGHT IN FRONT of the stage and chatted loudly to each other about fuck all in particular, and three of their mates were standing behind them having a really loud argument. i mean, fucks sake. i was really close to saying something to them, but one of the girls was really hard-faced and was wearing a ruffle dress that appeared to be made out of silver notes and i was worried she would kill me if i said anything to her.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by Jangloid Mark » Thu Sep 11, 2008 19:11

Yeah....we all talk at gigs, but, I agree, it's often how it's done. You wouldn't start a conversation halfway through a film in the cinema....
If a band is playing, and you want to chat, go to the bar/outside.
I've been to gigs where people have yapped right through not only the support bands but the main band as well. WHY THE FUCK ARE YOU HERE?

One promoter has now taking to putting signs up urging respect for the bands in light of people yapping through quiet sets. I think it's a really smart move...
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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by Mr Bear » Thu Sep 11, 2008 19:42

The Luminaire in London is the best venue I've been to for people not talking during gigs. Every time I've been there there's been a real respect for the people playing, no matter how full it is or whether it's a support band or headliner.

Don't know if this is anything to do with it.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by 13strongmonsters » Thu Sep 11, 2008 21:22

The last gig I went to where people were talking really obnoxiously was pretty cringe-making. It was Gowns at the Greenhouse in Brighton, a tiny basement venue. Gowns started their set, and a song and a half in, the sound cut out. The sound people fixed it (eventually) and they started again. Then the sound cut out again. They fixed it again. Then, storming into the set properly, loud chatter began emanating from at least three parts of the audience. There was a LOT of chatter from the back, some from right next to one side of the (floor-level) stage, and some from right behind me. I was pretty mortified because the chattering ninnies behind me were friends of friends who had come to the gig kind of at my invitation. Another friend was reviewing the gig, and was close to punching the chatterers she was so angry. She ended up describing the experience in her gig review... I'll see if I can find it...

On this freezing, bright-dark December evening, halfway through a beleaguered set, 24 people are watching Gowns. The Greenhouse Effect is full, the staircase outside is festooned with smokers, the bar is three-deep; Zettosaur have already skronked their way through a half-hour's pleasurable mayhem; and Erika is standing in the corner, facing a crowd of more than a hundred, her eyes screwed shut, her lips brushing the microphone. Her white Mustang beats rhythmically against her hip as it swings, and her hands describe some part of the past spilling out here, again, for us, and only 24 people are watching, squandered randomly among the first 8 rows of a crowd intent on boredom. Join the dots: it spells FUCK YOU.

Gowns began their set with a spoken-word piece. Erika strode onstage, wearing her familiar tour uniform, a torn, home-made t-shirt that reads 'MY OVARIES ARE A BREEDING GROUND FOR TERRORISTS', and whispered, clawing at her wrists, images of children and animals minded by maniacs, of plump arms in puppy jaws. Ezra, crouched behind his synth, and Jacob, seated on his bass amp, played pedal hopscotch. Erika's breath, pushing gently at the air around the PA, began to recall the Lynchian midwesternisms of the record, kids in the yard, a summersworth of lawn sprinklers, as Corey bowed his ride cymbal, both slowly and violently, a lovely cadence growing. But then, during the second song, as Erika coos 'and don't you know that I would never hurt you, you are such… a pretty…. thing,' the PA fails. The band waits a long time before anyone even moves to help, to begin the song again. And the sound fails once, twice more. This level of frustration is difficult to watch; the crowd begins to move away from the stage. People turn to one another, smirking over their beers, and most never really look back.

No matter where in the crowd I am, the noise is inescapable. During a halting, sinister cover of 'Happiness is a warm gun', braving the backroom to get to the bar, I come closer to a fistfight than I've been in years. But the opening drone of 'White like heaven' clusters hope in my stomach, and I push through until I'm inches away from the speakers, saturating. 'I was sitting at the table and suddenly I could see it, I could see it, I could feel it, I saw the world break open, oh, I could see all of it', Erika yells, over the distorted chorale of guitars and violin. Corey's occasional Bonhamisms find such a home in this song; the drums rattle and bang against my chest before slinking back into the final, utterly absorbing phrase. Then, over the lovely opening diads of 'Cherylee', the roar returns. The sound of the crowd is hollow, like a failing engine. 'I can't even see your faces anymore', Erika calls, as though across a huge distance. In what universe, when a band travels thousands of miles, starts and restarts and restarts a set, a set delivered, nevertheless, unflinchingly, and with such commitment, do you not shut the fuck up and listen? In what universe do you not take every possible moment of this into yourself? You've gotta look it in the eyes and say that I don't believe, you've gotta look up out the water until you can't hardly see. You've gotta know. Gowns leave the stage, and the crowd moves towards the exits to smoke, out in the well-deserved dark.


Was a good gig.
Last edited by 13strongmonsters on Fri Sep 12, 2008 13:42, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by Trev » Fri Sep 12, 2008 11:27

The solution to talking at gigs - here

or perhaps not.
not really here

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by Jono Volpone » Fri Sep 12, 2008 11:32

I felt really bad at the gig last night, as a friend I've not seen for a while was taking to me whilst Mexican Kids were on. I don't like talking at gigs, but I also didn't want to appear rude by ignoring her. I guess I could have just politely asked her to wait until they'd finished, but that didn't really feel right either.
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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by bocken » Fri Sep 12, 2008 15:07

Trev Lostmusic wrote:The solution to talking at gigs - here

or perhaps not.
I quite like the idea - say you want to see a band but don't want to go on your own (for some reason that is beside the point that I'm going to make), you can bring someone along who doesn't like the music but i perfectly happy in your company, and they can listen to their own choice of music instead. It would also be good if you wanted to meet people who liked bad music (for some other reason, maybe you fancy them or something) but you wouldn't have to hear the bands or clubs or whatever. I bet everyone looks dead stupid in that video though. Oh yeah, I forgot it was the Fun Loving Criminals.

At the Luminaire once a friend I hadn't seen in ages started trying to talk to me and I had to sort of shush him away. I wouldn't have minded but he works there, and should know better quite frankly.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by boney » Fri Sep 12, 2008 16:06

13strongmonsters wrote:The last gig I went to where people were talking really obnoxiously was pretty cringe-making. It was Gowns at the Greenhouse in Brighton, a tiny basement venue. Gowns started their set, and a song and a half in, the sound cut out. The sound people fixed it (eventually) and they started again. Then the sound cut out again. They fixed it again. Then, storming into the set properly, loud chatter began emanating from at least three parts of the audience. There was a LOT of chatter from the back, some from right next to one side of the (floor-level) stage, and some from right behind me. I was pretty mortified because the chattering ninnies behind me were friends of friends who had come to the gig kind of at my invitation. Another friend was reviewing the gig, and was close to punching the chatterers she was so angry. She ended up describing the experience in her gig review... I'll see if I can find it...

On this freezing, bright-dark December evening, halfway through a beleaguered set, 24 people are watching Gowns. The Greenhouse Effect is full, the staircase outside is festooned with smokers, the bar is three-deep; Zettosaur have already skronked their way through a half-hour's pleasurable mayhem; and Erika is standing in the corner, facing a crowd of more than a hundred, her eyes screwed shut, her lips brushing the microphone. Her white Mustang beats rhythmically against her hip as it swings, and her hands describe some part of the past spilling out here, again, for us, and only 24 people are watching, squandered randomly among the first 8 rows of a crowd intent on boredom. Join the dots: it spells FUCK YOU.

Gowns began their set with a spoken-word piece. Erika strode onstage, wearing her familiar tour uniform, a torn, home-made t-shirt that reads 'MY OVARIES ARE A BREEDING GROUND FOR TERRORISTS', and whispered, clawing at her wrists, images of children and animals minded by maniacs, of plump arms in puppy jaws. Ezra, crouched behind his synth, and Jacob, seated on his bass amp, played pedal hopscotch. Erika's breath, pushing gently at the air around the PA, began to recall the Lynchian midwesternisms of the record, kids in the yard, a summersworth of lawn sprinklers, as Corey bowed his ride cymbal, both slowly and violently, a lovely cadence growing. But then, during the second song, as Erika coos 'and don't you know that I would never hurt you, you are such… a pretty…. thing,' the PA fails. The band waits a long time before anyone even moves to help, to begin the song again. And the sound fails once, twice more. This level of frustration is difficult to watch; the crowd begins to move away from the stage. People turn to one another, smirking over their beers, and most never really look back.

No matter where in the crowd I am, the noise is inescapable. During a halting, sinister cover of 'Happiness is a warm gun', braving the backroom to get to the bar, I come closer to a fistfight than I've been in years. But the opening drone of 'White like heaven' clusters hope in my stomach, and I push through until I'm inches away from the speakers, saturating. 'I was sitting at the table and suddenly I could see it, I could see it, I could feel it, I saw the world break open, oh, I could see all of it', Erika yells, over the distorted chorale of guitars and violin. Corey's occasional Bonhamisms find such a home in this song; the drums rattle and bang against my chest before slinking back into the final, utterly absorbing phrase. Then, over the lovely opening diads of 'Cherylee', the roar returns. The sound of the crowd is hollow, like a failing engine. 'I can't even see your faces anymore', Erika calls, as though across a huge distance. In what universe, when a band travels thousands of miles, starts and restarts and restarts a set, a set delivered, nevertheless, unflinchingly, and with such commitment, do you not shut the fuck up and listen? In what universe do you not take every possible moment of this into yourself? You've gotta look it in the eyes and say that I don't believe, you've gotta look up out the water until you can't hardly see. You've gotta know. Gowns leave the stage, and the crowd moves towards the exits to smoke, out in the well-deserved dark.


Was a good gig.
I love that review, Petra Davis wasn't it? I missed seeing Gowns in Nottingham 'cause it was a mate's 33.3rd birthday, I'm still gutted.

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Re: Talking at gigs

Post by alexie » Sat Sep 13, 2008 02:42

I've been guilty of talking through shows on several occasions. Back in 2001, I remember watching Tortoise at a music festival and I had just met somebody who loved Belle & Sebastian as much as me (a very exciting thing for a 16 year old me). It was much more exciting talking about that than watching boring guitar noodling wank, but the people around us didn't think so - one girl came over and said, "excuse me, we're trying to listen to the band". And I mean, looking back, we were being quite obnoxious, and even though I still really dislike Tortoise, I guess there were people there who genuinely wanted to listen to the band.

Last year I went to see The Clientele and Robert Scott by myself, and ran into a girl from work there. I ended up sitting with her and her fiance, but I was torn because they kept talking really loudly through Robert Scott's set. I should have moved towards the front, away from them, but I ended up contributing to the noise and missed out on taking in a brilliant set.

In general, though, I try to restrict talking to little comments between songs, and save the rest for after the show.

What about people who sing along really loudly and really badly at shows?? Good or bad thing?
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