geology and geography

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Gordon
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Re: geology and geography

Post by Gordon » Mon Mar 02, 2009 22:30

I know a Human Geography PhD student at Edinburgh... She's also a city councillor and a lecturer in Marxism and Feminism at Napier. All I can reasonably say is that if you did the course you'd meet (potentially) at least one nice person.
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frogblast
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Re: geology and geography

Post by frogblast » Sat Jan 16, 2010 15:58

I didn't want to start a new thread just for this, so it's going here, even though only some of them are geography related (wait, what is geography again?)

Victorian Infographics. Link found through Flowing Data. (Among the other things they have linked to recently there are a couple of fun ones from The New York Times, which always seems to produce impressive infographics work, as well as some horrific satellite images and photos from Haiti)

A few of those victorian ones might be familiar to anybody who has read Edmund Tufte's books. I think I might have to print out the rivers/mountains one - I've always wanted a large copy of it, but was never able to find it at a decent resolution.

I'll have to investigate this http://www.davidrumsey.com site as well. Seems to let you download all sorts of old maps at high resolution, although converting MrSID to something viewable/printable on mac os x seems to be a bit of a pain. Maybe writing a simple GUI for converting files with GDAL will give me something to do this week.

(Also, it's amusing reading some of my previous posts in this thread, now that I've been unemployed for 6 months)
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frogblast
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Re: geology and geography

Post by frogblast » Wed Jan 20, 2010 22:44

uk gov just launched a new site: http://data.gov.uk/

looks like it's got all sorts of data sets on already.
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frogblast
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Re: geology and geography

Post by frogblast » Tue Mar 02, 2010 01:13

Flowing data made a choropleth unemployment map for the USA late last year, as well as a tutorial on how to make it yourself with Python. Some R users made their own versions of the original map, and another blogger made a tutorial about how to do it for Germany, so today I decided to make a UK version (since I'm unemployed and have nothing better to do than map unemployment…). It was a good chance to learn a little about R (although I'm not sure I learned much - it's pretty confusing).

Image
(larger size)

It was a bit of a pain preparing the data; the regions used by gadm.org differ in a few places from the national statistics unemployment data. I'd never realised quite how often the boundaries have been changed. The different categories could probably have been chosen a bit better, I just stuck with the first thing that looked reasonable. (Anybody wondering why Northern Ireland is missing: the National Statistics site doesn't seem to include data for NI).

The map data comes from http://www.gadm.org/ and the unemployment figures are here (why is the National Statistics website so horrendous?).

I'll have to have a look through data.gov.uk and see if I can find anything interesting to map.

*braces himself for the usual replies about all statistics being lies, especially government ones*
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crystalball
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Re: geology and geography

Post by crystalball » Mon Jun 16, 2014 10:11

This is a bit whooooa: Frozen underworld discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet

The geophysicist sounds a bit like how I'd sound if I'd made the discovery:
"They simply look spectacular,” said Kirsty Tinto, a geophysicist at Lamont-Doherty. “Everything was just flat parallel lines. That is how ice is supposed to be. But here it is breaking all the rules. You get these crazy, folded, distorted, overturned, undulating things at the bottom of the ice, and they are the size of skyscrapers."

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