A Thread for Beans

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miss deepfreeze
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by miss deepfreeze » Tue Jan 27, 2009 23:16

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Last edited by miss deepfreeze on Fri Jun 24, 2011 22:52, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by stolenwine » Sat Jan 31, 2009 21:59

this recipe sounds so delicious! i'd take out the bacon/bacon fat but hopefully that wouldn't affect the taste too much:
Florida Butter Beans with Caramelized Onions and Bacon

Florida butter beans, sometimes known as calico pole beans, are baby lima beans. I grew up hating all lima beans because my mother, like many mothers in the 1960s, didn’t quite know how to cook them to perfection. If you felt the same way, I urge you to give the heirloom varieties like this one another try.

Serves 4

1/2 pound Florida butter beans, soaked
4 slices high-quality bacon, diced
2 1/2 medium yellow onions
2 celery stalks, diced
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
Salt
3/4 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
Freshly ground pepper

Put the beans and their soaking water in a stockpot and add more cold water if needed to cover the beans by 1 inch. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, partially covered, until the beans are beginning to soften, about 1 hour.

In a medium, heavy skillet over medium heat, sauté the bacon until the fat is rendered and the bacon is beginning to brown, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels.

Pour off all but 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat from the pan and reserve. Chop half of an onion and add to the pan over medium heat. Add the celery and garlic and sauté until the vegetables are soft and fragrant, about 10 minutes. Add to the beans, reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer until the beans are tender, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. When the beans are nearly soft, season them with salt.

Meanwhile, cut the remaining 2 whole onions in half, then cut into thin slices. Wipe out the skillet with a paper towel, pour in 2 tablespoons of the reserved bacon fat, and set over medium-low heat. Add the sliced onions and a few pinches of salt. Cook, stirring, until the onions wilt. Reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are medium brown, soft, and caramelized, 45 minutes to 1 hour. Add 2 tablespoons water and stir to loosen any browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Add the thyme and season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the bacon to the caramelized onions and heat gently.

Top each serving of beans with some of the caramelized onions.

Substitution Note: Use Christmas lima beans.
i also want the rancho gordo bean cookbook. i'm sure most of the recipes can be modified to make them vegetarian:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Heirloom-Beans- ... 665&sr=1-1
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by Sootyzilla » Sun Feb 01, 2009 12:20

Being able to use tasty animal fat and ham and sausage in dishes like this that are mostly beans is the best thing about not being vegetarian if you ask me.
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by christine » Sun Feb 01, 2009 16:47

I made a giant crock pot full of black beans last weekend. They did taste kinda bland without the ham hock or insert gross piece of meat here. I eat chicken and occasional red meat, but I wanted to go without it. How do they make them so good in the Mexican places? I think it's the matriarchs who have those secrets.

The only downside is that now my crockpot has black bean stains in it. Help!

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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by squirrelboutique » Mon Feb 02, 2009 15:52

The majority of Mexican and Cuban restaurants here don't use meat or meat stock in their black beans. I think the secret is lots and lots of garlic and cumin, and I always add sauteed onion and green pepper.

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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by stolenwine » Mon Feb 02, 2009 21:41

here's a post from thekitchn.com about which herbs and spices go well with certain types of beans. it might help if you're trying to make stuff more flavourful:
• Aduki Beans: coriander, cumin, ginger

• Black Beans: bay leaf, chile peppers, cilantro, coriander, cumin, epazote, garlic, ginger, oregano, parsley, savory, thyme

• Black-Eyed Peas: bay leaf, cayenne, chile peppers, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, ginger, turmeric

• Cannellini Beans: parsley, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme

• Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans): cardamom, cilantro, coriander, cumin, fennel, garlic, ginger, mint, paprika, parsley, rosemary

• Fava Beans: basil, cilantro, cumin, fennel, garlic, mint, parsley, rosemary, sage, savory, thyme

• Flageolet Beans: parsley, savory, thyme

• Kidney Beans: bay leaf, cumin, fennel, oregano, parsley, sage, savory, thyme

• Lentils: bay leaf, cardamom, cilantro, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, cumin, curry, ginger, mint, parsley, oregano, thyme, turmeric

• Lima Beans: cilantro, mint, parsley, sage

• Mung Beans: cilantro, coriander, cumin, ginger

• Navy Beans: basil, bay leaf, garlic, parsley, savory, thyme

• Pinto Beans: chile peppers, cilantro, cumin, oregano, parsley, savory
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by Ash-R.S.D. » Wed Feb 04, 2009 14:19

crystalball wrote:
humblebee wrote:Is listening to conversations about prog rock as bad as listening to prog rock?
No matter how long they go on for, they're always shorter than a prog rock song, so that's something:

"That prog rock season on the telly over Christmas was genius!"
"Yeah, did you see the interview with Collins yesterday? Genius."
"Phil Co... I mean, Collins, yeah, I saw that, it was genius."
"He is much maligned but I reckon Collins is genius. He is so altruistic, he'd play drums on his friends' albums for no money."
"Yeah, genius, I respect him for that."
"Genius!"

Cannellini beans are also nice with pasta or rice, done a bit rustic with olive oil, onion, garlic and fresh tomatoes.
Dear Crystalball,

I really like prog myself and have had that exact same conversation myself on numerous occasions, so that post bought a smile to my face. We are genuinely a bunch of obsessive geeks who would spend all our time hugging each other if only we weren't so afraid of physical contact, but can you blame us? Of a population of 60 million, we seem to number in the hundreds! When we get the chance to talk to another human being about prog, we tend to go over the top about it, but if you check our union website we have issued several official apologies to the general public, and we are constantly working within communities to bring about a wider understanding of the meaning of Prog, sending round Genesis's Witnesses to people's home's to talk to them about the Church of Prog, and investing money in local Prog Grammar Schools.

Yours Sincerely,
Sir Ashley Askin of Canterbury,
Minister of Prog,
PRD (Prog Relations Department),
The Ministry For Prog,
Progshire,
Progland,
United Progdom
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by nanski » Mon Feb 23, 2009 09:01

has anyone ever eaten mung beans? i've used mung bean nuclease in the lab, but to my knowledge never eaten a mung bean. it always thought it sounded like a good insult: you mung bean.

Anyway... moving right along... if you ever find yourself in a UK train station in need of lunch, you could do worse than Marks and Spencers bean salad. It's usually located near the ready-made pasta salads. mmm
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by humblebee » Mon Feb 23, 2009 09:41

nanski wrote:has anyone ever eaten mung beans? i've used mung bean nuclease in the lab, but to my knowledge never eaten a mung bean. it always thought it sounded like a good insult: you mung bean.
Mung bean sprouts are nice. Crunchy and peppery. I like.

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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by roundbitsofplastic » Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:46

aren't normalbeansprouts (like inchinese restaurants) mungbeans? i thoughtthey were?

i like sprouted chickpeas. mmmmmmm.
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by Sootyzilla » Mon Feb 23, 2009 19:47

Aye, bean sprouts you buy are almost always mung beans, I guess they must grow the fastest or something. For some reason people often assume they're soy beans.

Sprouting them is the best thing to do with them too; if you cook them whole it takes forever even though they're tiny. If you get split ones they make an acceptable daal, but I'd still rather eat red lentils or channa.
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by Jangloid Mark » Mon Feb 23, 2009 20:01

I was kind of hoping that the 'full of beans' thing was referring to being full of zest for life, and get up and go, as opposed to the food variety....you see....I'm going to stick my neck on the line here and say....I've never really liked beans...

Butter beans don't taste too bad....although, they are way too dry for my liking....
As for baked beans....absolutely foul stuff....even as a kid, I never liked them at all...

I do actually quite like the soft black ones with the grey insides that you put in chilli con carne....and must admit, I do like chilli con carne quite a lot....I like to ground one (just one) of those little firecracker chillies to add just a slight little kick...and pepper....most of you will think I'm mad, but, you've got to put a fair bit of pepper into a good chilli con carne....
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by stolenwine » Tue Apr 21, 2009 23:46

when we were in tuscany last year we ate tons of these, they're so simple but SO freakin' good. i haven't tried this recipe but it sounds similar to what we had:

Tuscan-Style White Beans

(Fagioli Lessi)

SERVES 6 – 8

This simple preparation is a favorite way to prepare beans in Tuscany—home of the mangiafagioli, or bean eaters. NOTE: The cooking time for dried beans may vary; older beans often take longer to soften.

1 lb. dried zolfini or cannellini beans
4 tbsp. fruity extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, crushed
4–5 fresh sage leaves
3–4 whole black peppercorns
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. Sort through beans, discarding any small stones; then rinse beans under cold running water. Put beans in a large earthenware casserole, cover with cold water, and set aside to soak for at least 4 hours or overnight.

2. Drain beans; then add 12 cups cold water, 2 tbsp. of the oil, garlic, sage, and peppercorns. Cover casserole, and bring to a simmer over medium heat, about 1 hour. Season to taste with salt, reduce heat to medium-low, and gently simmer, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, until bean skins are tender and interiors are soft, about 1–2 hours more.

3. Remove from heat, set aside, and allow beans to cool in the cooking liquid. To serve, reheat beans in the liquid over medium-low heat, drain them, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Drizzle beans with remaining 2 tbsp. olive oil.
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by stolenwine » Sun May 24, 2009 21:29

jamie oliver was making this BEAUTIFUL borlotti bean dish on tv today. it was so simple but it looked amazing. it was boiled up borlottis with a bouquet garni and garlic, a potato and tomato. after it was all boiled up, he took out the bouquet garni and threw it out, but kept the potato, tomato and garlic. then he smushed them all up with the beans and some of the bean stock and it just looked AMAZING. i can't stop thinking about it. i wish we had all the ingredients so i could some up for dinner. i'm so excited about going back to italy and eating stuff like this.

edit: i found this recipe which is ALMOST the same as the one he did on the show. there's a video too. i know lots of people get annoyed by jamie oliver but i kinda like him.

recipe: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27648622

video: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp ... 8#27677318
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by roundbitsofplastic » Mon May 25, 2009 10:51

that does look pretty good, i might make that today or tomorrow.

in other bean realted news: today i will begin the process of sprouting some chickpeas.

ALSO! i am working on a potoato/split pea recipe, i've not quite perfected it yet though.
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by Jangloid Mark » Mon May 25, 2009 14:17

What are chick peas exactly? I've eaten them, but, never quite knew what they are....are they in any way related to green peas?
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Re: A Thread for Beans

Post by roundbitsofplastic » Mon May 25, 2009 14:27

they're a legums so i suppose they're related somewhere along the line. they're little beige things that look a little bit like tiny peaches (to me). and they're bloody GRATE. linky
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