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Fonts

Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 13:18
by macdangerous
Anyone know of a font which includes the International Phonetic Symbols?
Would make my working day much easier.

Posted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 13:56
by crystalball
As far as I know, Windows comes with phonetic symbols fonts in Word. I think you have to look in the symbols bit.

There is also this UCL website which seems a bit ancient but has three phonetic symbols fonts which are free to download.

Posted: Wed Nov 07, 2007 11:04
by humblebee
I had an email from an MP the other day and it was in Comic Sans.

Democracy is finished.

Posted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 04:21
by shaved head thrills
humblebee wrote:I had an email from an MP the other day and it was in Comic Sans.

Democracy is finished.
just saw this, but oh god LOL

Posted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 04:22
by shaved head thrills
speaking of fonts...

i want this so bad
SO BAD
its a beauty!

http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail ... UMT0000300

Typography

Posted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 15:45
by frogblast
This video is hilarious:
Comic Sans Saves The World:
http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1823766" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Mailbox, Mailbox, Maailbooox!

also:
Image

(Didot & Helvetica)

Re: Typography

Posted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 15:55
by humblebee
Heeee, that's brilliant!

I think there's already a thread called 'Fonts' - merge please, moddleypops!

Re: Typography

Posted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 16:15
by frogblast
oops, don't know how i missed that

Re: Fonts

Posted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 16:19
by Mr Bear
Done

Re: Typography

Posted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 16:26
by crystalball
frogblast wrote:This video is hilarious:
Comic Sans Saves The World:
http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1823766" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
"Not now Futura!"

Hee! This is ace! I always knew Century Gothic would be a hottie.

don't look, my insanity is showing.

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 20:10
by frogblast
why does InDesign not have the option to ignore punctuation (e.g. quotation marks, speech marks) when producing drop caps. i suppose it doesn't occur very often, unless you are doing something like setting a long poem with multiple parts, using hanging punctuation and want to use a drop cap for each new part, in which case it occurs multiple times. it's not very difficult to get round (just put the quotation mark in a separate text box), but it's a pain to have to keep moving them manually. (if there is in-fact a way to do this properly i would love to know)

i suppose the more general question is, do you put quotemarks within the drop caps characters or no. the new yorker seem to, but i think it looks a bit strange, but i can also see that not doing it would look weird in some situations, so, is there some convention?

what i did in the end, though i'm not convinced it looks right:
Image
what it looks like including the punctuation (obviously, just having a huge quotation mark looks absurd so i've not taken a shot of that):
Image
also, some images of 'optical margin alignment' on/off. the other verses are like the last picture (if they have quotation marks)
Image
Image

since this thread is called "Fonts" i had better mention that that font is Adobe Jenson Pro. i love the little crosses it has for full stops.

finally, just so everyone is absolutely sure i'm insane, there is a good article on wikipedia about spacing after sentences: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_spacing" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
which seems to back up what i was saying last year on bowlie about double spacing. after being informed that i was wrong to double space i went on a drunken spree of research and concluded much of what wikipedia says here:
As noted above, in the late 20th century there has been a designer-led trend to assert that single-spaced sentences constitute good style. The reasons offered in support of this trend are of three forms: stylistic, reader-centric, and historical.
The stylistic reasoning asserts that single-spacing is good style because it is considered good style; that is, spacing is a purely design decision.
The reader-centric reasoning asserts that double-spacing is detrimental to readers. However, empirical research has unanimously found the opposite (see Readability, above).
The historical reasoning asserts that single-spacing is the historical norm and that double-spacing is a typewriter-driven anomaly. Examples include the Font Site's declaration of The Rules Of Type, citing Cavanaugh's Digital Type Design Guide:[94]
"If you grew up prior to the advent of desktop publishing, chances are you were taught to put two spaces after periods, question marks, exclamation marks, and colons. The rationale was that it is easier for the eye to distinguish sentences in this fashion. When using monospaced fonts (read: typewriter fonts), there might be some validity to this. But this only applied to documents created with a typewriter. Since the advent of the printing press in the 15th century, typesetters have never inserted two spaces after punctuation."
However, even ignoring historical style guides (cited above), historical examples of printing practice clearly show the opposite is the case. In general, double-spacing was the norm (see above), and, despite Morris's 19th century efforts, single-spacing today is a profit-driven artifact of late-20th century high-volume mass-production commercial printing.
Since empirical evidence contradicts both the reader-centric reasoning and the historical reasoning, the designer preference for single-spaced sentences rests solely on design choice.
i.e. that double spacing was nothing to do with typewritters - it was the norm long before, and that in-fact the lack of en spaces/thin spaces on typewritters led to a reduction in the amount of spacing around punctuation. because i'm in a frustrated/drunk mood i'm going to be a dick and put it down to lack of scientific education among graphic designers/typographers. that they ignore the findings of scientific research in favour of following fashion and what they think looks better at unknown cost for those who struggle to read is hardly surprising. what is most amusing is that so many of them react so violently when confronted with double spaced text, and tell everyone who will listen that it's wrong, yet haven't even spent 10 minutes researching the subject (to be fair many of them will have the excuse of never having read or seen old books - but then what kind of graphic designer/typographer has never wondered how older books are laid out?)

anyway, this has all been very therapeutic, and if there is anyone i have not yet insulted/bored out their skin, i beg their pardon. but now i've got to fire up the A3 printer and stick some poetry to the bathroom wall next to the A3 picture of 'Salty'

Re: don't look, my insanity is showing.

Posted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:32
by crystalball
frogblast wrote:i suppose the more general question is, do you put quotemarks within the drop caps characters or no. the new yorker seem to, but i think it looks a bit strange, but i can also see that not doing it would look weird in some situations, so, is there some convention?

what i did in the end, though i'm not convinced it looks right:
Image
That looks fine to me. It's difficult because you can't really ignore the punctuation here but then you don't want it to look weird. I have to say that the second option also looks good to me but that's because the font is gorgeous and the quote mark really quite subtle. In the New Yorker example that you showed, it looked awful (double quotes are ugly anyway, aren't they?).

Re: Fonts

Posted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 19:38
by humblebee
This is nice: http://wordle.net" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

You paste in a chunk of text and it makes it into a pretty word-cloud!

There are some lovely fonts in there.
juggernautumn.gif
mess after buckley.gif
a day for destroying things.gif

Re: Fonts

Posted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 19:49
by crystalball
I think my heart's just stopped. That's the loveliest thing I've ever seen on the internet.

Re: Typography

Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 03:12
by RATCATCHER
crystalball wrote:
frogblast wrote:This video is hilarious:
Comic Sans Saves The World:
http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1823766" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
"Not now Futura!"

Hee! This is ace! I always knew Century Gothic would be a hottie.
Hahaha. Bookman Old Style made me laugh.

Re: Fonts

Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 08:58
by Mr Bear
humblebee wrote:This is nice: http://wordle.net" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

You paste in a chunk of text and it makes it into a pretty word-cloud!
Oh that's great. I had my CV open so I put it through there - it looks so lovely that I'm tempted to send it to a prospective employer that way!

Re: Typography

Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 10:49
by Wheatabeat
frogblast wrote: also:
Image

(Didot & Helvetica)
This reminds me... does anyone ever write a's like that?

Re: Typography

Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 10:56
by humblebee
Wheatabeat wrote:This reminds me... does anyone ever write a's like that?
I used to. In my teens. As a massive affectation. I probably thought it was more literary than crossing your 7s or something.

Re: Typography

Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 10:57
by indiehorse
Wheatabeat wrote: This reminds me... does anyone ever write a's like that?
I do when I'm feeling quirky. The letter g is also fun.

Re: Typography

Posted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 10:59
by Colin
Wheatabeat wrote:This reminds me... does anyone ever write a's like that?
I do, when it's at the start of a word. It's too clumsy otherwise.