what book are you reading?

I love a talking book, me
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Jeezy Creezy
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Post by Jeezy Creezy » Fri Jan 11, 2008 09:24

Slaughterhouse is quite entertaining if I remember correctly from reading it three years ago. I just finished Philip K dick's Valis and I liked that. I think Philip could have written a leaflet on aphid infestation and I would lap it up. Oh wait, he kinda did in the first chapter of Scanner Darkly.
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Post by a layer of chips » Fri Jan 11, 2008 09:32

Viz's Magna Farta.

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Post by round bits of plastic » Fri Jan 11, 2008 09:35

RITH wrote: I've just started reading Kurt Vonnegut's 'Slaughterhouse 5'. It's been gathering dust on my shelves for ages, so it's about time.
i read that years ago and i seem to remember the back and forth bits confusing me. but i remember enjoying it. i think that's going to have to be added to my vast "reread soon" list. Next on that list is "After Many a summer" by Aldous Huxley

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Post by knibbles » Fri Jan 11, 2008 13:32

I just read Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky by Patrick Hamilton and I well loved it, even though it was from the olden times.

My review would be that for a book about a prostitute it didn't have much shagging in it.

Oh, and it was very realistic.
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Post by Woodbine » Fri Jan 11, 2008 20:07

Dan Rhodes is always going on about that book.

I must read it.
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Post by DimitraDaisy » Fri Jan 11, 2008 20:09

Hello!

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Post by RITH » Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:07

Hobart Paving wrote:
RITH wrote:I've just started reading Kurt Vonnegut's 'Slaughterhouse 5'. It's been gathering dust on my shelves for ages, so it's about time.
I've had that on my shelf for years. Tell us if its any good.
Yeah, it's good.
(Ooh, Dennis thinks one of last centuries' absolute classics is quite good. Beethoven is nice. Have you heard Belle & Sebastian? Talented band! Et cetera.)

It's an original read, with all the skipping to past and future, but still the storyline is flowing nicely. Not as much about the actual bombing of Dresden as I'd expected, but the message is clear. Vonnegut is not trying to be hip for the sake of it; his style is refreshing and not annoying.

So take it off your shelf. It'll only take you 3 days or so to read.

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Post by yubo » Fri Jan 18, 2008 03:30

I've picked up a book for the first time in ages and am currently reading "A Pair Of Blue Eyes" by Thomas Hardy. Oh the suspense! I've been skimming over parts that are descriptive but unnecessary for the story because I want to know what what happens. It's debilitating as I haven't done much else but read this book.

I like how Hardy always makes me feel so fortunate.
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Post by squirrelboutique » Fri Jan 18, 2008 04:06

yubo wrote:
I like how Hardy always makes me feel so fortunate.
Right? Every time I read Jude the Obscure, I am reminded that these days girls are very lucky to have ways to flirt with boys that don't involve throwing pig penises at them.

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Post by alongwalkhome » Thu Jan 24, 2008 19:34

In my mailbox JUST arrived the Jonathan Franzen novel--Strong Motion--recommended to me by the lovely crystalball! It takes place where I live and she recognized the name of the city I live in. I can't wait to get started on it!

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Post by yubo » Thu Jan 31, 2008 14:23

squirrelboutique wrote:
yubo wrote:
I like how Hardy always makes me feel so fortunate.
Right? Every time I read Jude the Obscure, I am reminded that these days girls are very lucky to have ways to flirt with boys that don't involve throwing pig penises at them.

or that girls can have a romantic history!

though I'm finding, I really like his stories, but the telling of is sometimes difficult to get through. I put it down for awhile but was reading it again last night and I just wanted to shake some sense into Elfride. It was really frustrating.

Sometimes reading stresses me out.
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Post by Elvistears » Thu Jan 31, 2008 14:40

I managed to lose The Ginger Man and haven't gone out of my way to find it again. So I'm half-reading a runner's handbook and half-reading The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat - well, I say half-reading..only the preface so far. Not sure whether I can be arsed with it, actually. I wanted STORIES.

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Post by cuppie » Thu Jan 31, 2008 16:20

year of wonders by geraldine brooks. it's an elegant book sitting right at the crotch of chick lit, historical fiction and really good literature. it's not quite fully any of those things but it is about the plague so i'm enjoying it.

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Post by let it ride » Fri Feb 01, 2008 00:43

Image

It sounds lame, but it's good. It's an anthology of essays about Sex and the City. Lots of interesting stuff already, and I'm only on the second one, as I just started it. It makes me look at the show a bit differently too, which is nice. Although from some criticism I've read, there's too little criticism of e.g. Carrie being a size zero, yet we never see her at the gym or eating healthily etc etc. I guess it's mostly standardised anyway, but still. Hmm. We'll see!

I do lurve academic books about tv shows I like and know though. Even if they are a bit rubbish sometimes, it's always quite interesting to read.

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Post by Woodbine » Sun Feb 10, 2008 16:21

knibbles wrote:I just read Twenty Thousand Streets Under the Sky by Patrick Hamilton and I well loved it, even though it was from the olden times.

My review would be that for a book about a prostitute it didn't have much shagging in it.

Oh, and it was very realistic.
I'm now reading this at the moment, as your post here reminded me that I'd been meaning to track it down. It's brilliant, isn't it? I'm just at the start of the second of the trilogy. The first was great, I couldn't put the thing down - I think, bearing in mind he was quite young when he wrote it (about 25/26) there are elements of a slight lack of conviction in the writing, but the amount of absolutely knock your socks off lines that are also contained within just make the more naive elements seem endearing. I love the way you can sort of guess what's coming at the end (of the first story, at least) but you end up rooting for him anyway, and share the push and pull of his optimism and disappointment. Apparently there was a BBC dramatisation of it, and the DVD seems to be about a fiver on Amazon, so I reckon I'll track that down. I assume they've probably woven all the stories into one, but maybe not.

Are you tempted to read something else by Patrick Hamilton now?
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Post by Jeezy Creezy » Thu Feb 21, 2008 10:01

Dostoyevsky's Notes from Undergound.

I get quite excited reading it at parts and had to phone my friend at midnight to recite a particularly pertinent paragraph to him.
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Post by gumdrops+lollipops » Fri Feb 22, 2008 20:34

I really like Dostoyevsky, but often feel like a twit saying so. My friend's in a Dostoyevsky class right now; I might take it next year.

I am reading Robert Graves' biography currently, Goodbye to All That. I just finished Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden, about Cree soldiers in the First World War. Both for school, but enjoyable.

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Post by Jeezy Creezy » Sat Feb 23, 2008 15:29

gumdrops+lollipops wrote:I really like Dostoyevsky, but often feel like a twit saying so. My friend's in a Dostoyevsky class right now; I might take it next year.

I am reading Robert Graves' biography currently, Goodbye to All That. I just finished Three Day Road by Joseph Boyden, about Cree soldiers in the First World War. Both for school, but enjoyable.
My friend bought me it for my birthday and I was bit scared to start reading it in case it was a bit of a chore but I've beein loving it and smiling loads. Going to read The Idiot next.
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Post by Contravene » Sun Feb 24, 2008 14:16

I picked up Flashman and The Great Game last night. There really ought to have been a whole series of Flashman movies, but alas George MacDonald Fraser wasn't pushy enough for Hollywood.

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Post by Jeezy Creezy » Mon Feb 25, 2008 13:32

For some reason Flashman makes me think of Bruce Sterling's "Artificial Kid" even though are a different genre. All good though. On the subject of cyber punk novels, Neoaddix by John Courtenay-Grimwood was also a good 'un.
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