what book are you reading?

I love a talking book, me
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Martijn
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Post by Martijn » Wed Jan 02, 2008 14:20

No. Sorry. My other half once stayed with a Martijn in Glasgow, which is probably the same person. I never met him though. Martijn was a very popular name for (Dutch) children in the late 1970s/early 1980s, so there are loads of us around. I spent most of my school years being in a class with at least one namesake.

Right now I'm reading Kazuo Ishiguro's An Artist of the Floating World, which -according to the aforementioned other half- is not as good as his other books, but I like his books so much, I want to form an opinion myself.

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lynsosaurus
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Post by lynsosaurus » Wed Jan 02, 2008 15:59

What, you mean you don't know every Dutch person, ever? Shame on you!

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Post by Tomb » Sat Jan 05, 2008 09:40

Reading Ken Garners latest Peel Sessions book and the one about the record cover designs at Factory Records. Yes I got books for Christmas!

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Post by JohaN » Sun Jan 06, 2008 09:12

i've just finished "callisto" by torsten krol
which was FABULOUS - the darkest, funniest comedy i've ever read, i think... and sortof like reading a coen brothers film at the top of their game. so good!

and i've just started "the new granta book of the american short story" (a lovely present from the girlfriend) which is just about as ace as the title suggests (though i would think there are some glaring omissions... dfw?... but then, who wouldn't...)

also - dipping in and out of my recently-acquired "mcsweeney's vol22"... which has 3 sections:
1. "the poetry chains of dominic luxford" in which 5 poets choose 10 poets they like, and it features 2 poems by each... a great treasure-trove of mostly new poets
2 "the state of constraint: new work from oulipo"... which is as ace as any oulipo-lover would expect, complete with handy explanation of how each structure works
3. "the unwritten stories of scott fitzgerald": in which new writers were invited to flesh out unrealised ideas gleaned from fitzgerald's notebooks... with wonderful results!

all in all, a good start to the reading year!

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Post by Joanne » Sun Jan 06, 2008 13:43

JohaN wrote: and i've just started "the new granta book of the american short story"
Ooh I've read a lot of this, for uni though so I didn't really get to enjoy it, and had to read some of the really rubbish stories in it. Mostly pretty good though

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Post by manydjs » Sun Jan 06, 2008 18:02

i have just started reading "sexing the cherry" Its looking promising so far.

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Martijn
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Post by Martijn » Sun Jan 06, 2008 21:01

lynsosaurus wrote:What, you mean you don't know every Dutch person, ever? Shame on you!
Well, there are over 16 million of them. I know about 8 or 9 million, but tend to confuse some of the others.

On-topic, I finished the aforementioned Ishiguro book. It's a nice enough book, but it's like when he finished writing it, Ishiguro thought "hey, I can use that same idea, but then make it more subtle, more interesting and just generally better". And then he wrote The Remains Of The Day.

round bits of plastic

Post by round bits of plastic » Tue Jan 08, 2008 16:59

I'm reading the 2nd volume of "living my life" by emma goldman. she got arrested a ridiclous amount of times.

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RITH
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Post by RITH » Tue Jan 08, 2008 17:39

I'm reading Ian McEwan's Amsterdam.

So far it's got absolutely nothing to do with Amsterdam. I was afraid McEwan would bore me to death (after reading The Cement Garden a few years back), but this seems quite entertaining.

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Post by Martijn » Tue Jan 08, 2008 18:01

RITH wrote:(after reading The Cement Garden a few years back)
Was that for school, from one of those Blackbirds* pockets? I read that one too, I only (re)discovered it was by McEwan very recently. Never read anything else by him though and though I remember The Cement Garden to be quite strange and boring, I do want to read something else by him.

* Dutch people going for something like their A-levels, have to read a number of English books. To help them choose, they can buy five pockets for just a bit of money. For rather complicated reason, these pockets are called 'blackbirds'.

I just picked up a copy of Jonathan Coe's The House of Sleep for a pound at a local charity shop.

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RITH
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Post by RITH » Tue Jan 08, 2008 18:27

Martijn wrote:Was that for school, from one of those Blackbirds* pockets? I read that one too, I only (re)discovered it was by McEwan very recently. Never read anything else by him though and though I remember The Cement Garden to be quite strange and boring, I do want to read something else by him.
Yup. Blackbirds 1993.

McEwan's Atonement is a hit right now of course, because of the movie. I'm not that interested in the film, but indirectly it reminded me of having Amsterdam still unread on the shelves.

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Post by humblebee » Tue Jan 08, 2008 19:58

Martijn wrote:I just picked up a copy of Jonathan Coe's The House of Sleep for a pound at a local charity shop.
That is the best pound you've ever spent.

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Post by crystalball » Wed Jan 09, 2008 10:23

humblebee wrote:
Martijn wrote:I just picked up a copy of Jonathan Coe's The House of Sleep for a pound at a local charity shop.
That is the best pound you've ever spent.
What next? Striving for the Lazy Perfection for 50p?

That's my favourite book of all time, Martijn. Please look after it. :)

I thought The Cement Garden was rather, er, nice. Well, that's probably not the right word for it but I enjoyed it. Amsterdam less so. My favourites of his are The Child in Time, Saturday, Atonement and Black Dogs but seeing as we disagree over the other books, just ignore me.

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Post by Elvistears » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:36

I am trying to read "The Ginger Man" by (I think) J. P. Donleavy, but I've got a few pages in and its already getting on my nerves. Modernism is very nice, and all that, but I'm probably a bit traditional in that I like to be able to follow who is saying what, and work out how many characters are actually in the narrative. And I've read loads of hard stuff lately and I just want a nice story!

Does this book get any less confusing? Should I persevere?

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Post by SophieC » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:44

i really really want to read this book.

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When the people are being beaten with a stick, they are not much happier if it is called 'the People's Stick.'

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Post by nanski » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:55

Martijn wrote: Right now I'm reading Kazuo Ishiguro's An Artist of the Floating World, which -according to the aforementioned other half- is not as good as his other books, but I like his books so much, I want to form an opinion myself.
i really liked it. i liked reading his take on WWII from the point of view of a japanese character.
big hole! big hole! big hole! big man! big man!

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Post by DimitraDaisy » Wed Jan 09, 2008 21:58

lynsosaurus wrote: It just occurred to me that I think I know you! Are you the same Martijn who lived in Glasgow?
And are you the same Lyns I had cherry beer with, in Aberdeen by any chance?

And seeing as this is a thread about books, not about People One Knew Off The Internet Once Upon A Time, I'm reading a book called 'Living literacy' just now (for school). It's not as boring as I thought it would be.

Before that I read two Green Knowe books, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, and 'So many ways to begin'. And before that I can't even remember.

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lynsosaurus
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Post by lynsosaurus » Thu Jan 10, 2008 22:25

DimitraDaisy wrote:
lynsosaurus wrote: It just occurred to me that I think I know you! Are you the same Martijn who lived in Glasgow?
And are you the same Lyns I had cherry beer with, in Aberdeen by any chance?
The very same! Hello!

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RITH
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Post by RITH » Thu Jan 10, 2008 22:43

I've never met an Anorak. Bah.

I've just started reading Kurt Vonnegut's 'Slaughterhouse 5'. It's been gathering dust on my shelves for ages, so it's about time.

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Post by Elvistears » Fri Jan 11, 2008 08:37

RITH wrote:I've never met an Anorak. Bah.

I've just started reading Kurt Vonnegut's 'Slaughterhouse 5'. It's been gathering dust on my shelves for ages, so it's about time.
I've had that on my shelf for years. Tell us if its any good.

In case anybody cares, I am now sort of enjoying The Ginger Man, having figured out who is who. Sort of.

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